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General Chris Redfield's game appearances, ranked on Game Rant...

This is going to sound weird, but the version of Chris I like is in Resident Evil 5 in his Warrior costume, because of his massive exposed muscles, even though he's on the juice.
 
1) RE5 - A hero who persevered through self doubts and overcoming a long lived rivalry that threatened the fate of mankind.
2) RE6 - A broken hero coming to terms with the loss of his men while trying to prevent a 2nd world ending event.
3) CVX - A brother hellbent on saving his only sibling and willing to travel across the world to save her.
4) RE1 - An officer who survived a brutal betrayal and went through his first traumatic experiences losing most of his STARS members.
5) Rev1 - A barebones version of Chris that was about the mission and the mission only, not much personality shown here that wasn’t depicted better in other games.
6) RE8 - Carlos-Chris who puts lives in danger so he can stop a crazy 100 year old mold woman. This is the anti-Chris of the franchise that was a placeholder for unnecessary shock value.
7) RE7 - Not Chris, this was a rejected clone sent by BSAA for field testing.
 
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1. BIO7.

I thought about isolating Chris from the story and the gameplay, but decided that it would be a huge mistake, because there is nothing that would better characterize him than the actions and reactions he demonstrated. Besides, Chris is my virtual avatar, so my involvement was the "connective tissue" between him and me.

What I like about this journey is the fact that, in contrast to Ethan, I immediately got the picture that I'm controlling an experienced and well-equipped professional, but who is still a human being who can be outplayed. Lucas is a very clever villain, and the way the game presented the challenges he made gave me a sense of the stakes that I had long lacked in stories about recurring heroes. This reflected on Redfield, showing that he is not untouchable. In fact, he really could have died there, and I felt it.

After an intense segment in the tunneling shield, the game gave me a quiet and calm stage that gave me a break. The fact that Chris caught his breath resonated with me as well. I believed it was a challenge for him too. And this setup led us to the perfect punchline, in which Chris caught Lucas off guard, and Baker, shitting his pants and realizing how fucked he is, took off on the run. I swear, no Chris' story has ever given me as much joy as this particular moment.

However, all that I have described is only part of the reason why I like this version of Chris the most. The other part is the way the story represents his profession. Redfield is a soldier who loses comrades, kills monsters that were once humans, and murders terrorists. There is nothing heroic about it, it is the necessary physical and mental violence that soldiers go through and that stains them. No superhero bullshit.

2. Village.

Although Chris is not heavily present in this story, the game doesn't miss the opportunity to show his work from a different perspective. Redfield and his group are elite professionals, but they are not mutants like Ethan, so they must make any decisions carefully. Therefore, they investigate, gather intelligence and shape plans. Each member has their own expertise, so their responsibilities are distributed in the field camps they deploy.

When that sudden leak happened, so the agents had little time, they executed the operation quickly and efficiently, taking Miranda with military precision. But the fact that they miscalculated due to a lack of information about the mutant's abilities feels oddly realistic, which I especially love.

The fact that Chris can be harsh, punch you, and keep in the dark a person he cares about and who doesn't have the authority and proper skills to wage war has always been part of Chris' characterization, and Redfield is true to himself.

3. BIO6.

I like flawed characters, so Redfield's arc in this game is pretty appealing to me. The Armageddon-like ending only enriches this story, and the steak scene after it delicately sums up the journey that Chris has gone through to change and be true to the core idea of his essence. No wonder that many people like Redfield's campaign the most.

4. BIO5 and CODE: Veronica.

Frankly, I can't say much about these versions, except that they feel appealing. These are good men who have moral superiority and who save the world. To me, they fall into the archetype spectrum rather than the human one, but that doesn't make them bad characters in any shape or form.

5. The other versions of Chris.

Well, they're just blank. In the 2002 remake, for instance, Chris either doesn't care or almost doesn't care about the deaths of his friends. He's acting like he's overwhelmed by sedatives. The situation is a bit better in the original game, and in the Revelations game Redfield is just ridiculously focused, which gives the strong impression that Chris is a dumb brick, especially in the moments when Jessica flirts with him. The game's storytelling, in which the characters repeat different information several times to spoon-feed the player, doesn't make the situation any better in this regard.

As for faces and voices, they don't bother me as long as they don't look and sound bad, which hasn't happened so far.
 
Well, we are not the only ones who differentiate the characters into different versions. Capcom does that too. A recent interview revealed that there are three Jack Krausers for the company: Biohazard 4's, The Darkside Chronicles' and Biohazard RE:4's.

Each product is a separate world essentially. That's s why details and inconsistencies, such as the characters' appearances, are not so important.
 
That’s what happens when an IP going on for 30 years soon has so many writers and developers with their own version of what RE should be. I miss when Flagship took over and had control of character motivations and development. There was consistency for the most part up until 2012 when Rev1 basically put Jill through a blender and made her into a new character. Then the RE Engine games took it a step further and everyone is essentially a rebooted or reimagined version of their MT Framework counterparts.

Yet we are still getting CGI movies where it’s a mix of RE Engine likeness and MT Framework. Character appearances should be consistent or else its immersion breaking. If you play and watch everything in chronological order, the character faces and voices change so much between games it’s very jarring. All because Capcom excludes actors who go union. I don’t agree that each game exists in its own universe (besides RE:2, :3, and :4), otherwise what is the point of having canon at all? I loved it when Pete Fabiano stated that the originals and reimaginings co-exist but then leaves Capcom shortly after, so his words hold no weight at all. The fans have more passion for canonicity than the actual developers at this point.
 
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I'm afraid that all that's happening is the consequences of the foundation that the series had. Dividing products into separate entities is something that Kawamura has been alluding to for a long time:

Q. I see. Now according to BIOHAZARD GUN SURVIVOR, Umbrella's European branch on Sheena Island held Dr. Birkin responsible for what happened in Raccoon City…

A. GUN SURVIVOR is like "Alien vs. Predator" to the original "Alien" movie. You should treat it as a separate entity.

Q. Just a moment. GUN SURVIVOR was written by the late Mr. Sugimura of FLAGSHIP, and was mentioned in the opening narration of "BIOHAZARD 0"…

A. "BIOHAZARD 0" was under the control of FLAGSHIP. In that sense, it's close to GUN SURVIVOR.

Q. Understood.

Nothing has changed since then. Capcom just recited the incidents again.
 
That’s what happens when an IP going on for 30 years soon has so many writers and developers with their own version of what RE should be. I miss when Flagship took over and had control of character motivations and development. There was consistency for the most part up until 2012 when Rev1 basically put Jill through a blender and made her into a new character. Then the RE Engine games took it a step further and everyone is essentially a rebooted or reimagined version of their MT Framework counterparts.

Yet we are still getting CGI movies where it’s a mix of RE Engine likeness and MT Framework. Character appearances should be consistent or else its immersion breaking. If you play and watch everything in chronological order, the character faces and voices change so much between games it’s very jarring. All because Capcom excludes actors who go union. I don’t agree that each game exists in its own universe (besides RE:2, :3, and :4), otherwise what is the point of having canon at all? I loved it when Pete Fabiano stated that the originals and reimaginings co-exist but then leaves Capcom shortly after, so his words hold no weight at all. The fans have more passion for canonicity than the actual developers at this point.
QFT. 👍
 
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